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Welcome to the photo galleries of Fhrx Studios. For nearly twenty years now we've been photographically documenting every aspect of our work, from commencement to completion. Within these pages you'll find many photos of our demonstration cars and many photos of our work - both behind the scenes and the final product. There are also photos of cars from years gone by, photos of some of the shocking installation work we've diagnosed and repaired and last but not least; you'll find photos aplenty of Lamborghinis as Lamborghini Sydney is one of the many dealers whom we undertake various work for - everything from simple parking sensors to entire system builds. There are many images within these galleries so please be patient while they load. To hasten loading times we've thumbnailed each photo. When viewing the images from yesteryear and taking a trip down memory lane, please accept our apologies for the size and quality of some of them - there were no digital cameras back then. Many of these historical images have been scanned, some even from negative film.


Loom Wiring

There is a right way and a wrong way to wire up source units. We usually soldered and heat shrunk all cables and then tie them into three distinct looms (being power bunch, speaker bunch and unused bunch). This method allows the viewer to quickly and easily identify which cables are which without having to peel back messy tape - tape that will put glue residue over everything and start losing its stickiness after a short period anyway. This often leads to bear wires being exposed which are not good in anyone's book.

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Cable Running

When running aftermarket cables they should ultimately be run with the factory looms at all times as it is generally considered the safest places for cables to run - car manufactures perform copious amounts of research finding the safest place for cables to run so why not make use of their investment? Running larger cables with factory looms is not an easy task but with a fair amount of patience it can be done. Every now and then we come across areas where no existing cables lie. During these times the cable runs must be tied and deadened down every couple of inches to avoid any possible wandering. One thing you should not be doing is just lifting the carpet and stuffing them under there in the hope that no one ever goes looking for them. Doing this tends to lend itself to shorts and similar problems.

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Staying Within Exterior Confines

One would probably think this'd be a no brainer but believe it or not, we've even seen cables run all matter of places in vehicles. It's quite common to see various cables hanging down underneath to the point of touching the road however we've seen them run in even more startling places such as over the front guard and door and then back into the interior. If it wasn't for the photos you'd never believe it! Please people; if you cannot find a grommet in your firewall contact us!

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Staying Within Interior Confines

Just as we've seen cables run in some very peculiar places outside vehicles, we've seen some stunning examples of cable running within the confines of them too. When running cables inside your car you shouldn't see them from any normal seated position. Sure we've all seen the odd cable hanging down a little from under a dash from time to time looking to get snagged by the odd foot. But sometimes we see even more stunning examples - like when shops don't even bother running cables under carpet at all but rather just lay them on top.

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Grommets

When running cables anywhere in a vehicle where metal edges are going to be passed, grommets should always be employed. Whether it's through a firewall or through the cars chassis rails under the carpet and out of sight, grommets will prevent the cables rubbing through and eventually shorting out over time which could be fatal. This also includes when you're running cables out to the door mounted speakers. Another issue that could be faced is that as the cables shielding slowly strips away you'll get intermittent shorts as the car bounces around - this will drive you mad long before the main fuse blows.

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Joiners & Couplers

Sometimes we all have to join cables. Whether we're simply joining a power cable to extend its length or if you've relocated your entire battery setup to your boot, you should always use a coupler for single cables or a distribution block for two or more. What you should not do is simply throw a nut and bolt in there and electrical tape the whole affair together. Not only is this a terrible eyesore, it's also extremely dangerous if that tape ever comes loose.

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Distribution Blocks

If you are joining multiple cables you should use a distribution block. You should never just put the cable ends together in a great heap and simply tape them together. However this is only part of the equation though. For once you've employed the distribution block you need to secure it somewhere safe. This doesn't always mean simply screwing it down - there are actually many different tricks and techniques we use here to secure them. But one thing you definitely shouldn't do is to simply wrap them in tape and leave them just swinging in the breeze.

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Exposed Wires

When it comes to the termination of cables, whether it's just a bare end going into a fuse holder, distribution block or amplifier terminal block, or if they're being terminated with a ring or fork terminal; they should be coated with solder and where possible covered with heat shrink or jacket. On a bare cable end the solder not only holds the individual strands together to avoids flaying, the soft solder also gives grub screws something to bite into meaning the cables cannot come out of the female block they're connected too. Remember it only takes one single strand of wire to create an annoying short. If you're terminating with a ring or fork, then filling it with solder once it's crimped simply means the whole affair is welded together solid and has little chance of it ever coming apart.

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Damaged Wires

The following photos make for a shining example of why we harp on so much about protecting cables, not only in regards to terminating and shielding them correctly but also why we recommend so strongly that you run them with factory looms so they do not get damaged. Below is what happens when you don't take care of your cables and ignore the aforementioned advice. All these small nicks caused major issues in their systems, with some of them taking literally hours to find.

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Hardware Mounting

When mounting amplifiers, processors and other hardware, you should never just throw a few self-tappers into the floor of the cars as not only will you be damaging the customer's car, you'll also be exposing the floor to possible water damage such as rust and mold. Therefore we tend to manufacture racks and other mounting systems. Once these components are secured cables must be neatly run to them and secured, they should never just be left in a pile next to the hardware.

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Fuse Holder Mounting

When it comes to Fuse holders, we always manufacture a bracket to hold them as opposed to simply drilling a few self-tappers into the shock tower or firewall like we often see others do. Not only do plates look much better, they're also far safer, offer easier access and avoid any damage to the customer's car which is irreversible if they chose to remove the system.

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Earthing Amplifiers Correctly

The issue being addressed in the photos below is the upgrading of the earth cable. If the connection between the battery and body are not upgraded to equal or exceed the main stereo power cable, then current will not return to the battery, thus making your massive power cable near useless in delivering current to the amplifiers. More often than not though it's the point where the earth is attached that creates the bottleneck, not the cable itself. This is where multiple earth runs come in. For larger systems you should use a dedicated earthing kit (q.v.) but for smaller systems double or triple earthing is adequate. These earths should also run to factory bolts just to avoid drilling any holes and damaging any cars.

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Minor Vehicle Damage

When it comes to the damaging of vehicles, we suspect we may have seen it all. We'll address major damage later but for now let's have a brief look at the more minor damage done to customers vehicles, the most common of which is the result of drilling. If at all possible you should always manufacture brackets as we've discussed previously but it's just a little beyond us how someone managed some of these efforts.

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Major Vehicle Damage

Now if you thought the minor damage was bad, just have a look at the lengths some people will go to in order to fit various items to their vehicles that clearly shouldn't be there. As that old saying goes; you cannot fit a square peg in a round hole. However this simple law of physics certainly won't stop some people from having a red hot go anyway. People; do yourself and your vehicle a favour and research what equipment will actually fit in it, rather than just 'making' stuff fit, commando style.

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Mounting Baffles & Midranges

When mounting baffles and speakers many people tend to overlook one of the simplest laws of nature; element path. For subbass and midbass to be strong and punchy we need one side of the speaker to remain completely sealed to the other side. This is because when the cone moves suddenly it creates a high pressure cell on one side of the cone while a low pressure cell is created on the other side. Getting back to the law of nature; like water, air also takes the easiest path. This means unless you have sealed your baffles into your door and installed a gasket around your speaker, your air (and bass) simply disappears through the air gap around to the other side. The other main reason for creating a custom baffle is so the speaker mounts via the factory holes and prevents the need to drill metal.

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Securing Speakers Correctly

When it comes to installing speakers and more to the point; actually securing them, there are many different techniques we employ here to undertake this. Sadly we also tend to see many methods utilised which are not acceptable at all. This includes but is not limited to securing speakers with cardboard, sealant, glue and the king of all fixes; gaffer tape! If you do manage to make to past all this and onto actual hardware such as bolts or screws, please make sure you don't tighten them up to the point you bend the frame with excessive force.

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Sealing Enclosures Correctly

Construction is one area where many people let themselves down. Accuracy and tight tolerances are an absolute must when creating a speaker enclosure and all Fhrx Studios enclosures are almost completely airtight when first created, well before the sealer has been applied inside and out. You certainly shouldn't ever be able to see sunlight through an edge gap. Once they're internal edges are sealed they should then be coated with deadening. Material wise; our enclosures are normally made from builders or marine ply for the simpler designs and fibreglass for the more complex shapes. However that said we've made them from more exotic materials over the years - everything from Kevlar and multi-panel through to porcelain and even one from marble. They should never be made from cheap or inferior materials.

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Mounting Crossovers Correctly

When mounting crossovers out of sight remember that those little terminals are all live and uncovered on many crossovers. Therefore we tend to wrap each crossover carefully with carpet, plastic or insulation depending on the application before placing them out of harm's way. When actually securing crossovers we usually just deaden them down so we firstly don't drill holes in the door and secondly don't bend the comparatively thinner circuit boards within. Numerous times we've seen systems have shorts caused by bent crossovers due to over-tightening. Also; they should never just be stuffed into door bottoms either.

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Sound Deadening & Diffusion Tiles

Ever heard of a radio studio, television studio or recording studio without deadening? Maybe you've seen a movie cinema with carpet on the walls? Starting to notice a pattern? Even on cheapest of speakers including the factory ones will benefit immensely from sound deadening on the inner and outer surface of panels, giving you much stronger midbass and midrange without resonation. Following this we install a sound diffusion matt; this is placed directly under the speakers to prevent wave reflection. Just make sure that when you're having you doors deadening, you're getting your entire doors deadened.

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Screw Damage & Length

So you've installed all your new gear into your doors and with a big smile you grab your door trim in order to put it back on, only to find that your new equipment is getting in the way and stopping the door trim going back on flush. So what to do? Well most normal people would simply move their equipment around to allow the door trim to go back on (remember we said don't screw your crossovers down?). Would you believe though; that we've seen some shops just throw a self-tapping screw right through the factory trim into the door! While we're on the subject of screws; if you cannot help yourself and start screwing stuff in, please ensure you use the right length of screw so you don't screw into your seats or through something important like a fuel tank.

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